Weightlifting

6 Tips for CrossFit Snatch Training


Written by

Jacob Tsypkin:

1. Establish correct technique with the full snatch BEFORE training athletes for high reps in order to ensure that the two skills don’t cross over and make it more difficult to perfect mechanics.

2. In order to practice high rep snatches while still developing technical abilities, use dumbbell and kettlebell snatches instead. As an athlete progresses, don’t jump straight to using the full lift in metcons. Instead, work from the dumbbells through gradually more technical variations with the barbell. E.g. dumbbell hang power snatches become barbell hang power snatches, which become hang snatches, which become full snatches from the floor.

3. Mechanics for the snatch are different at high reps/for time. The changes occur below the knee: The hips will be higher, the shin will be more vertical, and the barbell will be closer to the ankle with the weight on the heels rather than on the mid-foot. This saves energy by taking the quadriceps out of the pull from the floor and saves time by eliminating the need to clear the knees and shift the weight toward the heels. Remember that this occurs on a spectrum! 30% in a metcon and 60% in a metcon should not look the same. The further the load is from 1RM, the more you can deviate from traditional weightlifting mechanics and vice versa.

James Townsend:

1. Get comfortable with being uncomfortable. Most of the time, beginners have problems setting up in the starting position. This may stem from mobility issues in the major muscles involved,  such as gluteus maximus, bicep femoris, soleus, vastus lateralis, etc. Identify these issues and correct them before touching the bar.

2. Establish the correct set-up form (with the bar) in the starting position. Sit in the starting position for 30 seconds or so for four sets then proceed to move into the motion of the first pull. From ground to knee, perform 10 reps for four sets. After establishing what the first pull feels like, move into the scoop. With the first three positions, perform the movements until it feels comfortable and familiar. Add in the fourth and fifth movement – the end of the second pull (shoulder shrug to high pull) and catch.

3. With a high rep range, mechanics will begin to break down and you will start looking like a zombie. Fatigue sets in, and your mind begins to tell you body to do something totally different. From novice to advance, it’s always important to revisit the basics of the snatch every chance that you get. Make it a cornerstone of your training.

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